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5 Unique Northwest Experiences Your Exchange Student Will Write Home About

If you find yourself wanting to do something special with your exchange student in Oregon or Washington, these ideas will have you covered!


1. Beaches

Sure, there are beaches all over the world, but the Pacific Northwest coastline has its own twist. It’s not everywhere you can see waterfalls tumbling into the ocean over rugged cliffs, or the forest backing up to the sea. Your exchange student will want to take lots of photos of the gorgeous coastline—especially if there’s a colorful sunset to boot.

2. Waterfalls

Sometimes it feels as if every hike in the Northwest comes with an amazing waterfall. They’re everywhere, and it’s a beautiful thing. Show your international visitor some of the landscapes and natural features that make this area unique. Even if he or she is more of a city slicker, everyone can appreciate the majesty of a waterfall and enjoy the feeling of mist on their skin.

3. Food Carts

These tiny, portable restaurants that are ubiquitous throughout the Northwest can be a marvel if you’re from a different country. Your exchange student will love seeing the foods of the world all lined up on a city block. Since America is such a melting pot, it’s possible that your student has never seen or heard of many of the foods offered.

4. Berry Picking

If you host during the summer or early fall, invite your student to go berry picking in a designated area or along a hiking trail. There are several varieties of berries that favor the climates of Oregon and Washington, including blackberries, huckleberries, blueberries, thimbleberries and salmonberries. Show your exchange student how sweet and satisfying it can be to eat a berry plucked fresh from the bush!

5. Learning How to Enjoy a Rainy Day

Everyone knows it rains a lot in the Pacific Northwest. How else would we have all of those beautiful forests, lakes and rivers? Especially if you host in the winter, it's likely that rain will strike (or hardly stop) while your exchange student is here. Show your student that “the show must go on” by not letting the rain impede your plans or spending time outside anyway. A little rain never hurts!
Is there a Pacific Northwest experience you’d add to this list? We’d love to hear from you on Facebook!

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Summer 2020 Spanish Language Programs - Info Meeting November 20th! Come learn about the different Spanish-language programs for Summer 2020! These immersion-based trips are your chance to stay with a host family, practice Spanish with native speakers, and learn about the local culture.



At the informational meeting we'll share more details about the different program options and the application process, hear from former participants for a student's perspective, and end with a Q&A session.
Can't wait until the then to learn more? Check out Spanish Programs on our website or Email info@andeo.org!
See you there!